Why keep pets?

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Why keep pets?


Release time:

2018-06-25

According to a group survey, half of the respondents believe that keeping pets can help improve mental health, but less than 10 percent of the respondents said they would choose to work with pets to relieve stress. Psychiatrists also say that pets are good for people's mental health.
 
The companion animal information center conducted a survey in 2004 and randomly interviewed 600 adults by telephone. The results showed that nearly 40% of the respondents said they were under great pressure; about 50% of the respondents believed that keeping pets was helpful to improve their mental health, but only about 6% of the respondents said they would choose to work with pets to relieve stress. The Companion Animal Information Centre believes that the public is not sufficiently aware of the benefits of keeping and living with pets.
 
The results of a 1998 survey in Australia and Germany fully show the benefits of owning companion animals: dog and cat owners see doctors less often and spend much less time in hospital than non-pet owners, which can save a lot of medical expenses.
 
In Australia, dog and cat owners make 12 per cent fewer visits to the doctor than non-owners; in Germany, 16 per cent fewer. On average, they spent 32 percent less time in hospital than non-owners; meanwhile, dog and cat owners took medication for heart disease and sleep difficulties significantly less than non-owners. There is a huge difference in hospital stay between pet owners and non-owners.
 
In Western countries, health care is a huge expenditure, accounting for about 6% to 15% of GDP. Therefore, even if the number of medical treatment is very small, it will save a lot of expenses. In Germany, health spending in 1996 was DM 354 billion, or 10 per cent of GDP. Of this expenditure, 96 per cent is public expenditure. In Australia, health spending was $36,591 billion million between 1994 and 1995, or more than 8 per cent of GDP. Of this expenditure, 68% is public and 32% is private.
 
Among those who own companion animals, older people benefit more because these people are (on average) not only lonelier than others, but also in poor health. In Australia, more than 60% of people who own a cat or dog see the doctor and take medication much less than non-owners. In Germany, older men who own a dog or cat see a doctor on average 3.0 times per year compared to 4.5 times for non-owners (33 per cent difference); the average number of days in hospital is 2.2 days compared to 6.0 days for non-owners (63 per cent difference).